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Get a Glow: The Best Foods to Eat for Healthy Skin

While taking care of your skin from the outside is important, healthy skin truly starts from within. Your skin is your largest organ, and eating the right foods can help you reduce acne, avoid wrinkles, and even stay looking younger, longer.

Chocolate – yes, chocolate!

It turns out that our favorite indulgence is also good for your skin! Its high levels of flavonols, which are a potent type of antioxidant, mean that eating a small piece every day can help fight free radical damage, and keep your skin looking youthful. Make sure to choose chocolate that is at least 70% cacao, to get the most benefit.

Nuts to you!

Munch a handful of walnuts every day to improve the tone of your complexion. Walnuts contain omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are beneficial to maintaining skin's elasticity and firmness. The nuts are also packed with copper, a mineral that boosts collagen production, which normally slows with age.

Shine on, sunflower seeds!

Sunflower seed oil is a great product to find in beauty products, as well as to consume in a beauty-conscious diet. The seeds contain skin-loving vitamin E, which protects skin from sun damage (although you should still slather on the sunscreen before you go outside). Grab a handful of these lovely seeds every day!

Soy far, so good

Soy is another all-star, for both inside and out. It’s a wonderful, natural ingredient in skincare products, to help you achieve a smooth, clear complexion. It’s also packed with minerals and proteins that make it a great choice for the healthy-skin diet. Try to incorporate some edamame in your daily menu, or choose soy milk in your morning latte.

Testing display of HTML elements

This is 2nd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 3rd level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 4th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 5th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

This is 6th level heading

This is a test paragraph.

Basic block level elements

This is a normal paragraph (p element). To add some length to it, let us mention that this page was primarily written for testing the effect of user style sheets. You can use it for various other purposes as well, like just checking how your browser displays various HTML elements by default. It can also be useful when testing conversions from HTML format to other formats, since some elements can go wrong then.

This is another paragraph. I think it needs to be added that the set of elements tested is not exhaustive in any sense. I have selected those elements for which it can make sense to write user style sheet rules, in my opionion.

This is a div element. Authors may use such elements instead of paragraph markup for various reasons. (End of div.)

This is a block quotation containing a single paragraph. Well, not quite, since this is not really quoted text, but I hope you understand the point. After all, this page does not use HTML markup very normally anyway.

The following contains address information about the author, in an address element.

Jukka Korpela, jkorpela@cs.tut.fi
Päivänsäteenkuja 4 A, Espoo, Finland

Lists

This is a paragraph before an unnumbered list (ul). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that for short items lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
  • Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

The following is a menu list:

  • One.
  • Two.
  • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer so that it will probably wrap to the next line in rendering.
  • The following is a dir list:

    • One.
    • Two.
    • Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer so that it will probably wrap to the next line in rendering.

    This is a paragraph before a numbered list (ol). Note that the spacing between a paragraph and a list before or after that is hard to tune in a user style sheet. You can't guess which paragraphs are logically related to a list, e.g. as a "list header".

    1. One.
    2. Two.
    3. Three. Well, probably this list item should be longer. Note that if items are short, lists look better if they are compactly presented, whereas for long items, it would be better to have more vertical spacing between items.
    4. Four. This is the last item in this list. Let us terminate the list now without making any more fuss about it.

    This is a paragraph before a definition list (dl). In principle, such a list should consist of terms and associated definitions. But many authors use dl elements for fancy "layout" things. Usually the effect is not too bad, if you design user style sheet rules for dl which are suitable for real definition lists.